Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

info@complexspine.london

Welcome to the Patient Hub

8 things you might not know about scoliosis

Most people know that scoliosis means an abnormal sideways curvature of the spine – often in an ‘S’ or ‘C’ shape – but there’s a lot about the condition that you might not be familiar with.Here are some key scoliosis facts:

1 There are different types of scoliosis with different causes

Scoliosis often develops for no clear reason, usually in childhood between the ages of 10-15 (idiopathic scoliosis), while sometimes children are born with it due to spinal bones not developing properly (congenital scoliosis). It can also happen as a result of other conditions, such as muscular dystrophy and cerebral palsy (neuromuscular scoliosis).

2 Scoliosis can develop in adults too

Scoliosis in adults can happen for various reasons. ‘Wear and tear’ and degenerative changes within the spinal vertebrates and discs, or muscular imbalances may cause the spine to slope sideways, referred to as degenerative or postural scoliosis.

3 Temporary ‘secondary scoliosis’ is also a thing

Sometimes the spine can suddenly develop a scoliosis-type sideways curve as a result of acute muscle spasms due to sciatic nerve compression – after a disc prolapse, for example. This is almost always temporary and will correct itself as the underlying problem heals.

4 Scoliosis doesn’t always cause pain

Sometimes pain isn’t an issue at all, while for others scoliosis can result in mild to severe pain. This is more likely in younger people with severe spinal curvature, or in adults where the underlying degeneration is also causing nerve compression. However, pain isn’t the only consideration – scoliosis can affect people psychologically too, and might impact on things like breathing and movement.[answerpacktv video=”what-are-the-treatment-options-for-scoliosis” header-only=”yes” single-view-mode=”yes” view-playlist-label=”View More” header-link=”/video/#!/scoliosis/scoliosis/what-are-the-treatment-options-for-scoliosis” landing-page-header-title=”What treatment options are available for adult scoliosis?” landing-page-header-text=”View more videos on Scoliosis”]

5 Not everybody with scoliosis needs surgery

Surgery is only generally recommended if the curve is severe or getting worse, or if it’s causing symptoms – such as pain – that are impacting on a person’s quality of life and there’s a good chance surgery would help. The procedure usually involves inserting screws and rods into the spine and ‘fusing’ it into a straighter position.

6 Most scoliosis surgery is performed on teens and young adults

This is partly because adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the most common type of scoliosis. Surgery’s usually recommended if the curve is 45-50-degrees or greater – but it’s mostly a personal choice rather than an urgent medical need. Our specialist surgeons can talk you through exactly what to expect and all the possible pros and cons involved, to help patients and their families consider their choice. Our information video on treatments for adolescent scoliosis explains more.

7 Adults can sometimes benefit from scoliosis surgery too

While there tends to be less need for scoliosis surgery in adults, and the surgery may be a little more complicated for older people, it may be recommended if your consultant believes it could be beneficial.

8 Other treatments also play a role

For growing children and teens, wearing a special back brace can sometimes help prevent spinal curvature from getting worse. Physiotherapy and things like Pilates can also play a role in managing scoliosis, while your consultant can advise on pain management options. Some people find complementary therapies, alongside self-care and lifestyle measures, can be beneficial and support your general wellbeing too. Find out more in our information video on exercises that can help scoliosis.Are you considering scoliosis surgery for yourself or your child? Our specialist surgeons are here to help – book a consultation via our enquiry form or call us on 020 3950 2409.

Treatments

Non Surgical

Select from a list of spinal injection treatments

Surgical

Select from a list of spinal surgery procedures

The London Independent Hospital
1 Beaumont Square, London E1 4NL

0808 101 0337

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

The London Independent Hospital
1 Beaumont Square, London E1 4NL

0808 101 0337

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

London Clinic
20 Devonshire Pl, Marylebone, London W1G 6BW

02079354444

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

Lycahealth Canary Wharf
1 Westferry Circus, Canary Wharf, London E14 4HD

020 7132 1440

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

Hospital of St John and St Elizabeth
60 Grove End Rd, London NW8 9NH

020 7806 4000

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

Blackheath Hospital
40-42 Lee Terrace, Blackheath, London SE3 9UD

020 8318 7722

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

London Bridge Hospital
27 Tooley St, London SE1 2PR

020 7407 3100

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

Bupa Cromwell Hospital
164-178 Cromwell Rd, Kensington, London SW5 0TU

020 7460 2000

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

The Wellington Hospital
Wellington Pl, London NW8 9LE

020 3733 5344

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

Highgate Hospital
17-19 View Rd, Highgate, London N6 4DJ

020 8341 4182

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

Otima health
19 Harley St, Marylebone, London W1G 9QJ

020 7036 8800

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

Harris Private and International Patient Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital
Great Ormond St, London WC1N 3JH

020 7405 9200

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

The Portland Hospital
205-209 Great Portland St, London W1W 5AH

020 3627 1534

Mon - Fri 09.00 - 17.00

Sat - Sun CLOSED

  • Select your nearest London location